A US Senate panel has approved a bill habilitating news agencies to negotiate with Facebook and Google for revenues

A US Senate panel has approved a bill habilitating news agencies to negotiate with Facebook and Goog ...

The US Senate Judiciary Committee approved a measure that aims to allow news organizations to collaborate on negotiations with Alphabet''s Google and Meta''s Facebook to increase revenues.

According to a congressional adviser, the measure had been passed by a vote of 15 to 7, and it must now go to the Senate for their approval. A similar measure is currently being debated in the United States House of Representatives.

After years of criticism that large tech firms use their content to attract traffic and advertising revenue without fairly compensating publishers, the bill is intended to give news and broadcast organizations more of a clout.

Senators John Kennedy and Lindsey Graham, like Senator Alex Padilla, expressed their opposition to the bill.

In the midst of a speed bump this month, Senator Ted Cruz received backing for a plan to include provisions that would address what he believes are the stifling supporters.

On Thursday, Klobuchar received support for a measure that stated that pricing for content was the issue.

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"The objective of the bill is to provide compensation to local news organizations when major corporations, such as Facebook and Google, access their content," she said during a committee meeting to vote on the measure.

Some progressive groups argue that this measure, including Public Knowledge, is favoring large broadcasters like News Corp, Sinclair, and Comcast/NBCU.

Facebook and Google are all affiliated to the Computer & Communications Industry Association and NetChoice.

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