Earth in a different light is shown in an ISS photo

Earth in a different light is shown in an ISS photo ...

A wonderfully unique image of Earth from the International Space Station (ISS) has been shared by an American astronaut.

Don Pettit, a three-time space visitor who currently sits on the terra firma, posted the stunning photo on his Twitter account on Monday.

The long-exposure image (below) shows Earth through the space stations Cupola module''s windows. If you look carefully towards the bottom left left of the picture, youll also see some beautiful star trails.

The astronaut wrote in his tweet that with a Fish-eye view of the Earth, city lights flow as orange streaks fade, and faint star trails that show the Earths rotation are visible in the lower left. Astrophotography can also experiment with science and art!

From the Cupola to the @iss, city lights flow as orange streaks are shown below and faint star trails that show the Earth''s rotation are visible in the lower left. pic.twitter.com/JwrFeZMl7v is a research project underway in the United States.

Don Pettit (@astro_Pettit) on September 11, 2022

Another Pettits photo that demonstrates Earth lights and star trails has triggered a sluggish reaction online.

Pettits'' most recent space trip was in 2012, so space enthusiasts must be erfrey by the fact that the experienced astronaut and keen astrophotographer is presenting some of the extraordinary photographs he captured almost a decade ago.

While Pettits works may be stunningly surreal, more recent ISS residents have shared Earth images that reveal more evident characteristics of the land and sea.

During his most recent mission, French astronaut Thomas Pesquet captured some spectacular images of our planet. If you consider the incredible view, then consider again. It takes a lot of planning.

Cupola has seven windows, allowing astronauts to go and relax during their downtime.

The most largely unobstructed views make the Cupolaan a popular work area, as astronauts can use it to monitor and assist non only spacewalks, but also the arrival and departure of spacecraft.